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Subterranean Museum | Via

What was once an enormous salt mine in turda, romania, has now been carefully renovated by the regional cluj county council into the world’s first salt mining history museum. the salina turda salt mines were excavated in the 17th century, proving a crucial source for salt that brought the romans much wealth. today, the durgau lakes at the mine’s surface – responsible for much of the salt deposits in the area – are popular tourist attractions that guarantee a steady flow of visitors all year around. a trip down the vertical shafts that once transported thousands of tons of salt will slowly reveal the immense scale of the excavated earth, made blatantly clear upon reaching the very bottom of the mine which is covered in a sand-like layer of salt.

Almost borrowing a certain aesthetic from the deep sea, the bottom of the mine features almost alien structures made of timber members and illuminated with suspended tube lights. the interior maintains a steady 11-12 degrees celsius and 80 percent humidity, completely devoid of any allergens and an almost absence of any bacteria, making the unique micro-climate a destination for those suffering from allergic respiratory diseases.

Hunter’s Gate

Hunter’s Gate

“The remarkable capacity of language for being rich even inits poverty was well known to eighteenth centurygrammarians. In their purely empirical conceptions of thesign, they were struck by the way in which a word maydivorce itself from the visible form with which it is associatedby its signification, and then attach itself to a different one,designating it with an ambiguity which is both a limitationand a resource. In behaving this way, language is discoveringthe origins of its own inner movement. Its relationship towhat it says may change without its form also changing, as ifit were rotating upon itself, tracing round a single focus awhole circle of possibilities ( the ‘sense’ of the word as theycalled it in those days) and allowing for accidents, encountersand effects all the more or less concerted efforts of thegame. According to Dumarsais, one of the subtlest of thosegrammarians, it was absolutely necessary to make the sameword serve for different purposes. It was noted that thisadmirable expedient could add to the vigour and grace ofdiscourse, and it naturally developed into a game orentertainment. So by chance and by choice, words oftendiverted from their original meaning to assume anothermeaning which is more or less remote from it, while stillbearing some relationship to it. This new meaning of words isknown as its tropological sense and the conversion orsemantic shift producing it is called a trope. All figures ofrhetoric are created through this kind of displacement ofmeaning (what Dumarsais called ‘turns’ and ‘deviations’):catachresis, metonymy, metalepsis, synecdoche,antonomasia, litotes, metaphor, hypallage, and many otherhieroglyphs traced by the rotation of words within thelinguistic mass.”Michel Foucault.1

“The remarkable capacity of language for being rich even in
its poverty was well known to eighteenth century
grammarians. In their purely empirical conceptions of the
sign, they were struck by the way in which a word may
divorce itself from the visible form with which it is associated
by its signification, and then attach itself to a different one,
designating it with an ambiguity which is both a limitation
and a resource. In behaving this way, language is discovering
the origins of its own inner movement. Its relationship to
what it says may change without its form also changing, as if
it were rotating upon itself, tracing round a single focus a
whole circle of possibilities ( the ‘sense’ of the word as they
called it in those days) and allowing for accidents, encounters
and effects all the more or less concerted efforts of the
game. According to Dumarsais, one of the subtlest of those
grammarians, it was absolutely necessary to make the same
word serve for different purposes. It was noted that this
admirable expedient could add to the vigour and grace of
discourse, and it naturally developed into a game or
entertainment. So by chance and by choice, words often
diverted from their original meaning to assume another
meaning which is more or less remote from it, while still
bearing some relationship to it. This new meaning of words is
known as its tropological sense and the conversion or
semantic shift producing it is called a trope. All figures of
rhetoric are created through this kind of displacement of
meaning (what Dumarsais called ‘turns’ and ‘deviations’):
catachresis, metonymy, metalepsis, synecdoche,
antonomasia, litotes, metaphor, hypallage, and many other
hieroglyphs traced by the rotation of words within the
linguistic mass.”
Michel Foucault.1

'Treasure town'

'Treasure town'

Tekkonkinkreet (michael arias japan 2006)

Tekkonkinkreet (michael arias japan 2006)

Photo match render for Buck ONeill Builders offices in San Francisco.
Viz practice. (Needs work)
Its been suggested the plants need some work and maybe some AO might might make it less pristine. There’s quite a few niggling things now I look at it… Bugger.

Photo match render for Buck ONeill Builders offices in San Francisco.

Viz practice. (Needs work)

Its been suggested the plants need some work and maybe some AO might might make it less pristine. There’s quite a few niggling things now I look at it… Bugger.


Yamauchi MichioTokyo, 2003

Yamauchi Michio
Tokyo, 2003

Northampton Re-creational Gardens

Northampton Re-creational Gardens